Archive for January, 2017

Thai Chicken Pie

Posted on: January 9th, 2017 by Harriet Low No Comments

1. For the filling cut all the chicken into 1.5cm chunks. Heat the oil in a sauté pan or wide saucepan over a medium low heat. Add the shallots, garlic, chilli and ginger and fry gently for a few minutes until soft but not coloured.

2. Stir in the curry paste and cook for a minute or two. Add the chicken. Increase the heat a little and cook, stirring until it has lost it’s raw look. Add the coconut cream, chicken stock, lime leaves, lemongrass and sweet potato. Simmer for 12-15 minutes, until the sweet potato is tender.

3. Add the cornflour liquid, bring to a simmer and stir until the sauce begins to thicken, then take off the heat. Taste the sauce and season with pepper and a little fish sauce. Set aside to cool.

4. To make the pastry, put the flour and salt in a bowl. Add the diced butter and lard and rub in with your fingertips until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs. Alternatively, do this in a food processor or a mixer and then transfer to a bowl.

5. Now work in just enough cold water to bring the pastry together. When the dough begins to stick together use your hands to gently knead it into a ball. Wrap the pastry in cling film and place in the fridge to rest for about 30 minutes.

6. Heat your oven to 200°C/gas6.

7. Remove the lemongrass and lime leaves from the cooked pie filling if you prefer and transfer to a 1.2 litre pie dish.

8. Roll out the pastry on a lightly floured surface and cut a 2cm wide strip of pastry. Dampen the rim of the pie dish with water, press the pastry strip onto it and dampen this too. Use a pastry lattice cutter to cut a pattern in the remaining piece of pastry. Pull the pastry very gently to open up the lattice, then place over the pie. Press the edges down to seal, then trim away the excess pastry.

9. Brush the top of the pie with beaten egg then bake in the oven for about 30 mintues, until golden. Leave the pie to sit in the tin for 5 minutes before serving with steamed or stir-fried greens.

Taken from Paul Hollywood’s Pies & Puds, published by Bloomsbury

Photograph © Peter Cassidy

 

White Cob

Posted on: January 1st, 2017 by Harriet Low 1 Comment

1. Tip the flour into a large mixing bowl and then add the salt and yeast, making sure they are placed on opposite sides of the bowl. Add the butter and ¾ of the water, turning the mixture around using your fingers. Slowly add more water until all the flour has been incorporated. When the dough is soft and not soggy it is ready. Move the mixture around the bowl to clean the sides until the mixture forms a rough dough.

2. Cover your work surface with a little oil and then begin to knead the dough. Knead for 5 – 10 minutes, working through the wet stage until the dough starts to form a soft, smooth skin and feels silky. Put the dough into a large, lightly oiled bowl and cover with a tea towel. When it has risen to at least double in size and the dough is bouncy and shiny it is ready. This should take at least 1 hour, but can be left for 2 or even 3 hours.

3. Line a baking tray with baking parchment or silicone paper.

4. Place the dough on a lightly floured surface and shape into a ball by knocking it inwards several times until all the air is knocked out and the dough is smooth. Then flatten the dough into a rough rectangle and then roll it into an oblong. Turn the dough so that the longer edge is running away from you and flatten it slightly. Now roll the two ends in towards the centre, so you end up with a chunky squarish shape. Turn the dough over so that the join is underneath.

5. Next, using both hands you need to shape the dough into a smooth domed cob. With your palms turned upwards, position your hands on each side and slightly under the dough. Using your hands tuck the dough neatly underneath itself. Continue, softly forcing the sides of the dough down and underneath, creating a smooth, taut top and a rough underside. Try not to add too much extra flour during shaping.

6. The dough is now ready for proving. Place it on your baking tray and place this in a clean plastic bag. Leave to prove for about 1 hour, until it has at least doubled in size and the dough springs back if you prod it gently with your finger. Whilst the dough is proving turn your oven to 230°C and put a roasting tray in the bottom to heat up.

7. Once ready dust your dough with some flour and then slash deeply with a knife. Add hot water to the hot roasting tray, this will create steam in your oven giving your bread a lighter crust. Put your bread into the oven and bake for 30 minutes or until it is cooked and sounds hollow when tapped on the bottom. Leave your cob to cool on a wire rack.